The Tyndale Fellowship is a fellowship of Christians engaged in biblical and theological research. Its aim is to promote the Christian faith through careful study done in a spirit of loyalty to the historic Christian faith as enshrined in the Ecumenical Creeds of the Church and the Reformation Settlements. Its members accept the theological position of Tyndale House.


Tyndale Fellowship members include evangelical scholars from all over the world. Scholars involved in biblical research or university-level teaching are invited to apply for membership, with the support of an existing member. Members receive a free subscription to the Tyndale Bulletin, free admission at Tyndale House Library for up to ten days a year, occasional newsletters, and an invitation to the annual study groups.

For over sixty years the Tyndale Fellowship and Tyndale House have been closely associated. Further information about the work of Tyndale House is available on its website.

Closely associated with the work of the Tyndale Fellowship is the Kirby Laing Institute for Christian Ethics (KLICE). For further information, please visit their website.
 

Save the Date

Dates of 2017 Tyndale Fellowship study groups

Philosophy of Religion

Christian Doctrine

Ethics & Social

Theology

Old

Testament

Biblical

Archaeology

New

Testament

Biblical

Theology

26-28 June

28-30 June

28-30 June

3-5 July

4-5 July

5-7 July

5-7 July

 

Biblical Theology Call For Papers:

‘The city of God from a Biblical Theology Perspective’.
 
The apostle John’s vision of the New Jerusalem brings to a significant climax the book of Revelation. John’s vision draws on imagery that goes back to the opening chapters of Genesis, underlining that the entire biblical metanarrative has a sustained interest in the concept of God dwelling with humanity on the earth. In light of this, various Old Testament books give prominence to the importance of Jerusalem/Mount Zion for the outworking of God’s redemptive plan. Furthermore, Scripture has much to say about Babylon, which is portrayed as the antithesis of the ‘city of God’. These brief observations underline the importance of the ‘city of God’ within the Bible.

We are keen to have a range of innovative papers that will provide an opportunity for us, as a study group, to reflect upon and discuss how the concept of the ‘city of God’ may be approached through the discipline of Biblical Theology.

We welcome offers of papers from members of the study group and sympathetic non-members who have recently completed their PhD, or are in the process of doing so.
 
In the first instance, offers of papers should be made to the Chair of the Biblical Theology Study Group, Dr. Desi Alexander at t.d.alexander@union.ac.uk.
 

Christian Doctrine Call For Papers:‎
 
The Reformation Today
 
At the 500th year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, the Christian Doctrine group of the ‎Tyndale Fellowship seeks short paper proposals for exploring the reformation in the world today.
 
‎Exploring the complicated history and legacy of a movement of the people, taking the Bible out of the ‎hands of the elite clergy and giving it to the common people, we are interested in papers that may do ‎the following, explored in historical, political, ethical, and theological perspectives:

          ‎-‎          excavate under-known features of particular 16th and 17th c. developments that are part of
                      the ‎German, Scottish, French, Dutch, English, etc. reformations‎

‎          -‎          showcase further and ongoing results of the radical reformation, pietism, Anabaptism or ‎
                      puritanism in public contexts where they developed ‎
          -          ‎highlight the reformation in exile as various Christian movements with roots in the 
                      reformation ‎historically found themselves in foreign lands, under persecution, or starting
                      anew as their ‎traditions evolved
          -          ‎explore political, geographic, and economic implications of reformation theology in historical ‎
                      and contemporary perspectives—for example with constitutionalism, theonomism, ‎
                      secularism, capitalism, etc. ‎
          -         ‎chart threads of the reformation in various traditions representing global Christianity in the
                     20th ‎c. and today, and possible legacies for methodology, ecclesiology, or other well-known ‎
                     reformational doctrines—sola scriptura, sola fide, sola gratia, solus christus soli deo gloria
          -         ‎explore questions of what it might mean to do reformation theology today, defined vis-à-vis ‎
                     historical and present forms of Roman Catholicism
 
For each of the above, we expect doctrinal formulations to be of particular consideration framing the ‎various reflections, although welcome constructive proposals that move beyond historical research. ‎
 
Paper proposals should be between 150-200 words and submitted by 28th February to ‎jsexton@fullerton.edu
 
 
Old Testament Call For Papers:
 
Reformation and the Old Testament
 
In 2017 it will be 500 years since Martin Luther nailed his theses to the cathedral door. In celebration of this, the Old Testament Study group will be looking at the theme of Reformation and the Old Testament.
 
We are looking for papers that look either at examples of reformation in the Old Testament or at the use of the Old Testament in the Reformation.
 
All proposals for papers should be sent to the chair of the group, David Firth at d.firth@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk


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